Wed 28 Feb, 2018

What’s made clear by these statistics is the Scottish Government’s continued emphasis on promoting private car use at the expense of public transport, especially buses. John Finnie MSP

Scottish Transport Statistics published today (28 Feb) reveal a worrying decline in bus use say the Scottish Greens.

John Finnie MSP, the Scottish Greens’ transport spokesperson, says the decline is not surprising and that regular delays and cancellations are in part to blame.

The Green MSP also says the statistics “make a mockery” of Ryanair’s claimed reason for relocating routes from Glasgow to Edinburgh.

Finnie, a Highlands and Islands MSP, said:

“What’s made clear by these statistics is the Scottish Government’s continued emphasis on promoting private car use at the expense of public transport, especially buses. The steady decline in bus use throughout Scotland is hardly surprising, given how many of us have come to expect long waits for delayed and non-existent buses and how poorly services here compare with other parts of Europe. That’s why we’ll continue to campaign for local public ownership of buses and to stop companies cherry-picking profitable routes and leaving communities stranded.

“The figures, that show a 22% rise in air travel, also make a mockery of Ryanair’s claim that they’ve scrapped routes, and potentially jobs, from Glasgow Airport just to move them 50 miles along the road to Edinburgh Airport because the government won’t cut air passenger duty. These statistics prove that the aviation industry is the mode of transport that least needs a tax cut.”

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