Mon 6 Jun, 2016

Students and teachers have clearly been let down. Ross Greer MSP

Ross Greer, Education & Skills spokesperson for the Scottish Greens and MSP for the West of Scotland, today backed calls for an inquiry into a computing science exam paper that was full of errors.

The National 5 exam has been described by teachers as one of the worst ever set.

It comes amid concerns that the number of computing science teachers in Scotland has fallen by 109 in the past two years.

Ross Greer MSP said:

"An investigation into what went wrong with this exam paper is absolutely essential. Students and teachers have clearly been let down. 

"How a paper which seems so thoroughly flawed could have made it through quality control processes and on to students’ desks raises serious concerns. I’ll be raising this issue with ministers as soon as possible.”

 

Get involved

More like this

Greer steps up call for action amid fear music teachers could disappear from schools for good

Wed 14 Nov, 2018

Scottish Greens education spokesperson Ross Greer MSP today (14 Nov) stepped up his call for action from government after the country's biggest teaching union raised the prospect that music teachers could soon disappear from schools for good.

At today's meeting of Holyrood's Education Committee, Mr Greer highlighted that local councils facing funding pressures are cutting staff, as well as charging for tuition, pricing many children out of learning an instrument.

Scottish Greens welcome inclusive education commitment

Thu 8 Nov, 2018

Today (8 November) the Scottish Greens, the first party to back the TIE campaign for LGBTI inclusive education in Scotland, welcomed the Government’s announcement that it would accept in full the recommendations of the LGBTI Inclusive Education Working Group’s report.

Ross Greer MSP, Scottish Green Spokesperson for Education, said:

Ross Greer demands action on school music tuition barriers

Wed 7 Nov, 2018

A Green MSP is demanding government action to stop musical instrument tuition becoming an exclusive activity after Holyrood’s education committee heard from a young person how skyrocketing charges are creating ‘Victorian’ levels of inequality in music.

Linlithgow Academy pupil and MSYP Alice Ferguson explained how her school band had lost members because pupils now have to pay £382 a year, Alice said, “It is only the privileged that are getting to do music now - it’s like Victorian times, where only the elite get these opportunities. This increases inequality”.