Wed 17 May, 2017

Turbo-charging the sector's growth will do nothing to help the vast majority of Scots who struggle with the costs of everyday transport. Patrick Harvie MSP

Patrick Harvie MSP, Economy spokesperson for the Scottish Greens, will today (17 May) put forward amendments to the Air Departure Tax Bill to stop the Scottish Government's plans for a socially and environmentally damaging tax cut for airlines.

The Bill is due to be debated today at Holyrood's Finance Committee, and Mr Harvie's amendments ask for an aviation emissions policy to be developed before the new tax's rates and bands are set, and for that policy to include a drive to reduce emissions compared to 2005 levels.

The amendments make it a requirement that when tax rates are set there is an assessment of the social, economic, fiscal and environmental impacts.

Research for the Scottish Greens shows that the richest 10 per cent of households stand to gain four times as much as the poorest 10 per cent from the government's aim of halving air duty.

Previous questioning by Green MSPs revealed that the cut would fuel aviation growth and increase climate change emissions by 60,000 tonnes a year.

Patrick Harvie MSP said:

"SNP Ministers with the support of the Tories want to give the hugely profitable aviation industry a tax break when they already get away without paying fuel duty. My amendments are aimed at turning a socially and environmentally damaging tax cut into a responsible piece of legislation. 

"We must know what impact this new tax will have on our economy, public finances, climate emissions and social equality before the rates are set. This Bill is an opportunity to drive down aviation emissions. Turbo-charging the sector's growth will do nothing to help the vast majority of Scots who struggle with the costs of everyday transport.”

 

Patrick Harvie's amendments to the Air Departure Tax (Scotland) Bill

Our analysis shows SNP air tax cut would benefit richest 10% of households four times as much as poorest 10% (Scottish Greens, 25 April 2017)

 

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