Fri 16 Aug, 2019

Scottish Greens education spokesman Ross Greer has urged Edinburgh Council to “see sense” over plans to restrict school climate strikes to once a year.

Edinburgh councillors will today decide whether to restrict permitted days off from school to a single day per year, after a Scottish Green motion called for councillors to back days of action by Scottish Youth Climate Strike (SYCS) group on September 20 and 27.

The strikes are part of a coordinated global movement started by sixteen-year-old Swedish school pupil Greta Thunberg.

Commenting, Ross Greer said:

“Instead of treating these young people like truants, Labour and SNP councillors need to start listening to them. They must recognise that school pupils have been forced to take this action by the failure of previous generations to stop the climate crisis.

“Green councillors made sure that Edinburgh led the way on supporting the first school climate strikes this year. Instead of taking this backwards step, the council should recognise that these actions are not only admirable, they are entirely in keeping with the Curriculum for Excellence and the objective of developing responsible citizens.

“We are in a climate emergency, with the UN giving governments just a decade to turn things around. Clearly our leaders need to educate themselves on the facts before deciding whether taking this vital political action damages the education of our young people.”

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School Reopening: Letter to the Cabinet Secretary for Education

Ross Greer MSP Mon 29 Jun, 2020

To: John Swinney MSP, Cabinet Secretary for Education

29 June 2020

Dear John,

Measures to protect pupils and staff in schools

I am writing following your statement to Parliament on Tuesday 23rd, announcing the Government’s intention that schools return full time and without social distancing on 11th August. As I am sure you appreciate, it is vital that the appropriate measures are in place to ensure the health and safety of pupils, staff and the wider community.