Wed 13 Nov, 2019

John Finnie MSP

Highlands and Islands
Justice, Transport & Tourism, Rural & Island Communities

Website

The inquiry into the death of Sheku Bayoh must have the power to summon witnesses, Scottish Green justice spokesperson John Finnie has said.

Responding to a ministerial statement laying out the proposals for a “full and public”  inquiry, John Finnie said key people like former Chief Constable Sir Stephen House should be brought in to give evidence.

Responding, John Finnie said: “I welcome this inquiry, and it is vital this inquiry is able to get the full picture from all involved, so that the family impacted by this tragedy can get some answers.

“That means it must be able to compel witnesses to attend, including prominent players such as the former chief constable Sir Stephen House.”

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